Brain Solutions NV

Healthy Thinking

Office Injuries to Look Out For

Posted by on Jan 28, 2017

You have a lot on your mind already. You have work to do and deadlines to reach, and the last thing you want to worry about is injuries in the workplace. But injuries do happen in the office, and it is much more common than you think.

According to the Fort Walton Beach workplace injury attorneys of the Bruner Law Firm, workplace injuries may be subject to legal action. But to avoid all the attorney fees, medical costs, and other financial burdens associated with workplace accidents, it is still better to just prevent accidents outright.
Below is a list of common office dangers that you should look out for.

Lifting Injuries
Offices don’t generally have heavy objects that require lifting, but it doesn’t mean that workers are safe from lifting injuries. Piled up documents and other potentially heavy office items can be a primary cause of injury, especially if the lifting is not done properly or the employee is not very physically gifted. Don’t be afraid to ask co-workers for help, or if you should do the lifting alone, get the support that carts and trucks provide.

Poor Ergonomics
There may be no obvious dangerous conditions or products in your workplace, but you may still be vulnerable to injury because of subtle factors such as the design of your work station. If your chair does not support your back, your computer monitor is too high or too low, or if your keyboard is not on a proper level, you may experience various problems involving your eyes, neck, back, and wrists. Make sure that the elements in your station is adjusted to properly accommodate your body, and don’t be afraid to take a break to avoid wearing yourself out.

Slips and Falls
Your office is a busy place, and there is a tendency that there are equipment, loose cables, debris, spills, and other obstructions that may cause you to trip, slip, or fall. To prevent such things to happen, organization of work materials is key. Maintaining the cleanliness of the workplace is also important to avoid unnecessary obstructions. This is particularly true when weather conditions are taken into account, like when ice, snow, and rain, create hazardous circumstances to both the exterior and interior of the office.

Read More

Information About Drug Impaired Driving You Need To Know

Posted by on Oct 19, 2016

We are all well aware of the negative impact of impaired driving on human beings. Operating a motor vehicle requires attention and decision making ability on the part of the individual. When a driver is high on alcohol or drugs, it will be difficult for them to focus on what is happening on the road and make decisive actions. The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration reported that 33,561 people died in traffic crashes in 2012.

The 2013 National Survey on Drug Use and Health (NSDUH) revealed that 9.9 million people more than 12 years old reported driving under the influence of illicit drug a year prior to the survey. Alcohol, drugs, and driving do not mix and will often have negative consequences. According to the website of Karlin, Fleisher & Falkenberg, LLC, impaired , driving impaired can have tragic effects on the life of the plaintiff. DUI/DWI is a crime and may have serious repercussions on the offender.

Both alcohol and drugs can affect the various human abilities needed for driving. Alcohol is a depressant that can slow down the functions of the central nervous system. It can affect a person’s information processing and cognitive skills as well as their hand-eye coordination or psychomotor skills. Drugs, on the other hand, can affect their judgment, reaction time, motor skills and memory. Aside from that, it can affect perception, motor skills, and memory.

The good news is that the number of alcohol-impaired fatalities has declined over the years. From 1982 – 2014, fatalities have decreased by 53%. But while alcohol impairment has declined, driving under the influence of drugs or DUID continues to increase. A driver’s level of intoxication is determined by their blood alcohol content (BAC). The threshold level for BAC is either 0.5% or 0.8%. Anything greater than that is punishable and may subject an individual to fines and even imprisonment.

Read More

Medical Mistakes should not go Unnoticed or Unpunished

Posted by on Jul 26, 2016

Whenever walk-in patients make a consultation visit to a doctor, the questions they usually ask are centered only on what their illness is, what medicine they should take and how often they should take the prescribed medicine.

It is natural for patients to trust doctors due to their expertise when it comes to health. Too much trust, however, blinds patients from the reality that even the best doctors can commit mistakes. In fact, more than a quarter of a million people die every year due to medical mistakes, making these the third leading cause of death in the U.S.

Wrong diagnosis is just one of the many different types of medical mistake or medical malpractice. Failure to correctly diagnose a patient’s real condition is due to failure in detecting the warning signs of a real and more severe health condition, like one that can lead to a stroke.

Stroke, also known as Cerebral Vascular Accident (CVA), is caused by a pause in the flow of blood to any area of the brain. This can be caused by a blood clot in the blood vessels or in the Cholesterol plaque (these are the products of heart disease; these begin in artery walls and continue to grow over the years. This growth of cholesterol plaque slowly blocks the blood to flow in the arteries. If it suddenly ruptures, the sudden blood clot that may form can cause a heart attack or stroke). Before a major or large stroke, a patient usually suffers a Transient Ischemic Attack (TIA) first. TIA is what medical professionals identify as a warning stroke or mini stroke; it usually last for only about 20 minutes, as the flow of blood usually resumes afterwards.

A stroke is definitely preventable, but only if its symptoms are get detected early and the person given proper treatment. Failure to diagnose it and render proper treatment, however, can easily result to paralysis or patient’s death. In fact, according to the American Stroke Association, more than 500,000 individuals suffer a stroke every year. About 200,000 of those who suffer stroke end up disabled, while the many more others end up dead.

The symptoms of stroke are sometimes hard to determine due to their resemblance with other types of serious health conditions, like severe migraine attack or diabetic hypoglycemia. The presence of other warning signs, though, like unexplained severe headaches, dizziness, loss of coordination or balance, difficulty in understanding or speaking, difficulty in walking and in seeing either from one or both eyes, and weakness or numbness on one side of the body, may be interpreted as signs of stroke; but to be more certain, requiring the patient to undergo more tests may be called for. These symptoms, especially TIA, should never be taken lightly. On the contrary, patients displaying these symptoms should be given emergency care.

In the website of the law firm Schuler, Halvorson, Weisser, Zoeller & Overbeck, P.A., it is said that doctors are charged with the very lives of those in their care and that even the smallest oversights or mistakes in the medical field can have devastating effects on unsuspecting patients. Though no doctor would intend to harm any patient, it is also important to send a strong message to the medical community that carelessness resulting to harmful mistakes will not go unnoticed or unpunished.

Read More